Blog Archives

Methods of Control

Control methods for aquatic weeds are numerous and varied but may be divided into physical, chemical, and biological approaches. Currently, only mechanical methods are used to control Eurasian watermilfoil in the Okanagan. Physical Control Rototilling – Rototilling removes the roots


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Aquatic Weed Management

The OBWB has been responsible for Eurasian watermilfoil control in the Okanagan Basin since the 1970s. After many years of experimenting with different methods, the OBWB now focuses on harvesting in the summer and rototilling the root system on shallow


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What We Do

The current Eurasian watermilfoil control program, methods, machinery and techniques were developed by the BC Ministry of Environment in cooperation with OBWB staff. Several factors were considered during program development, including environmental concerns, public acceptability of control methods, effectiveness of


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About Eurasian Watermilfoil

Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) is a rooted submersed plant inhabiting the shallow waters of lakes in British Columbia and other parts of North America. The species is said to have been introduced from Eurasia in the late nineteenth century, likely


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Milfoil – Overview

The OBWB has been responsible for Eurasian watermilfoil control in the Okanagan Basin since the 1970s. After many years of experimenting with different methods, the OBWB now focuses on harvesting in the summer and rototilling the root system on shallow


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